Topics & Issues

1. Introduction

2. Key Concepts in CBI

3. Assessment and Analysis

3.1 CBI Situation Analysis

3.2 Market Analysis

3.3 Gender Analysis

3.4 Partner Capacity Assessment

3.5 Assessment and Selection of Financial Service Providers

4. Programme Design

4.1 Appropriateness of CBI

4.2 CBI Modality

4.3 Grant Amount Frequency

4.4 Payment

5. Programme Implementation

5.1 Contract the Payment Agent

5.2 Target Beneficiaries

5.3 Set up beneficiary registration and identification system

5.4 Distribute cash and vouchers

5.5 Coordinate with others

6. Monitoring and Evaluation

6.1 Impact, outcome and process monitoring

6.2 Market monitoring

6.3 Feedback and complaint mechanism

7. Other Considerations

8. Annexes

9. Other Resources

1. Role of advocacy in an emergency

1.1 CI roles and responsibilities for advocacy

1.2 Role of a policy and advocacy advisor in an emergency

2. Critical steps for advocacy

3. Approaches to advocacy

4. How advocacy fits in CARE’s emergency response

5. Rights-based frameworks for advocacy

6. Activating and coordinating advocacy in CARE

6.1 Support for CO advocacy efforts

6.2 Global-level advocacy

7. Issues identification and prioritisation

7.1 Common advocacy themes in emergencies.

8. Criteria for deciding to engage in advocacy

8.1 Key criteria

8.2 Assessing risks of advocacy

9. Developing an advocacy strategy and taking action.

9.1 Different levels of planning

9.2 Key questions and strategy format

9.3 Problem analysis

9.4 Goal and objectives

9.5 Rationale for CARE’s engagement

9.6 Target audience

9.7 Identifying allies and opponents

9.8 Advocacy messages

9.9 Tools and actions

9.10 Opportunities and events

9.11 Human and financial resources

9.12 Risk management

9.13 Monitoring and evaluation

10. Advocacy in relation to non-presence emergency operations

11. Annexes

1. Introduction

1.1 Definition of conflict sensitivity

1.2 Suggested minimum standards for conflict-sensitive emergency response

2. What to do: Response options

2.1 A ‘good enough approach’ for rapid onset crises

2.2 Slower onset and more detailed analysis

2.3 Acting upon the understanding

2.4 Case study: Unintended impacts of food aid distribution in Burundi

3. What not to do: Do no harm and other common mistakes

3.1 The impacts of aid – both positive and negative

4. When and where to get specialist help

4.1 Case studies: Aid exacerbating conflict

5. CARE’s capacity and experience

6. Annexes

7. Other resources

1. Introduction

1.1 What participation is

1.2 Types of participation in humanitarian action

1.3 How emergencies affect participation

1.4 Why participation is important in an emergency response

2. Assessment checklist

3. What to do: Response options

3.1 Case study: Peru

4. What not to do: Do no harm and other common mistakes

5. When and where to get specialist help

6. CARE’s policy commitments

6.1 CARE’s programming framework

6.2 Sphere Common Standard 1: Participation

6.3 CARE’s Humanitarian Accountability Framework: Benchmark 4

7. CARE’s capacity and experience

8. Annexes

9. Other resources

1. Introduction

1.1 Definition of protection

1.2 Key legal instruments

2. Assessment checklist

2.1 Simple protection analysis

2.2 General protection assessment checklist

3. What to do: Response options

3.1 Key principles for a protection approach

3.2 Mainstreaming protection

3.3 Human rights promotion

3.4 Case study: Different approaches for different contexts

4. What not to do: Do no harm and other common mistakes

5. When and where to get specialist help

6. CARE’s policy commitments

7. CARE’s capacity and experience

8. Annexes

9. Other resources

1. Introduction

2. Definitions

3. CARE’s Humanitarian Accountability Framework (HAF)

4. Commitments on Humanitarian Quality and Accountability

4.1 The Core Humanitarian Standard (CHS)

4.2 CHS quality criteria and indicators

4.3 CHS Verification

5. Humanitarian Performance Targets

5.1 Target 1: the Scale

5.2 Target 2: the Scope

5.3 Target 3: the Strength

6. HAF Accountability System

7. Quality and Accountability (Q&A) Roles and Responsibilities

8. Q&A Checklist for COs

9. Q&A Resourcing

10. Q&A Technical Support

11. Annexes

1. Overview

1.1 What sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) is

1.2 How emergencies affect sexual exploitation

1.3 Why prevention of sexual exploitation is important in an emergency response

2. CARE’s policy

2.1 Policy at the global level

2.2 Policy at the CARE International Members level

2.3 Policy at the field level

3. Applying the policy in practice

3.1 Minimum requirements for prevention of SEA in emergency response

3.2 Additional suggested actions

4. Annexes

5. Other resources

1. Introduction

1.1 What disaster risk reduction is

1.2 Disaster risk reduction key concepts

1.3 Why disaster risk reduction is important before emergencies

1.4 Why disaster risk reduction is important during and after emergencies

2. Assessment checklist

3. What to do: Response options

3.1 Mainstreaming disaster risk reduction

3.2 Case study: Practical examples of DRR issues during emergency response

4. What not to do: Do no harm and other common mistakes

5. When and where to get specialist help

6. CARE’s policy commitments

6.1 Key principles for mainstreaming disaster risk reduction

7. CARE’s capacity and experience

8. Annexes

9. Other resources

1. Introduction

1.1 Definition of the environment

2. Assessment checklist

3. What to do: Response options

3.1 Case study: Sri Lanka

4. What not to do: Do no harm and other common mistakes!

5. When and where to get specialist help

6. CARE’s policy commitments

7. CARE’s capacity and experience

8. Annexes

9. Other resources

1. Introduction

2. CARE’s Humanitarian Policy Framework

3. CARE’s vision, mission and programming principles

3.1 CARE’s vision statement

3.2 CARE’s mission statement

3.3 CARE’s programme principles

4. CARE’s Humanitarian Mandate Statement

5. Emergencies within CARE’s strategic plan

6. CARE’s commitment to international principles and standards

6.1 Code of conduct

6.2 International law

6.3 Common humanitarian standards

7. Annexes

8. Other resources

1. Role of emergency preparedness planning (EPP) in an emergency

2. Preparing for an emergency

3. EPP guidelines and steps

4. EPP and CO management frameworks

5. EPP and security management frameworks (SMF)

6. Annexes

7. Other resources

1. Overview

2. CARE’s policy

3. Applying the policy in practice

4. Case study: Humanitarian space restrictions

5. Other resources

1. Overview

1.1 What civil-military relations are

1.2 Civil-military relations and international humanitarian law

1.3 Civil-military relattions in the context of natural disasters

2. CARE’s policy

3. Applying the policy in practice

3.1 Minimum criteria

3.2 Operating principles

3.3 Organisational obligations

3.4 Preparedness

3.5 Coordination and joint approaches

3.6 Funding associated with military actors and military objectives

4. Annexes

5. Other resources

1. Introduction

1.1 What humanitarian coordination is

1.2 Why humanitarian coordination is important

1.3 Types of humanitarian coordination mechanisms

1.4 UN-led humanitarian coordination mechanisms

1.5 Host government coordination

1.6 NGO coordination

2. CARE’s policy

2.1 Position on humanitarian coordination.

2.2 Expectations for CARE participation in coordination mechanisms.

2.3 Advocacy issues

2.4 Engagement with non-humanitarian actors

3. Applying the policy in practice

4. Annexes

5. Other resources

1. Introduction

1.2 Why it is important to address HIV/AIDS during emergencies

2. Assessment checklist

3. What to do: Response options

3.1 IASC’s Guidelines for HIV/AIDS interventions in emergency settings

3.2 Case study: Preventing food crisis in Malawi

4. What not to do: Do no harm and other common mistakes

5. When and where to get specialist help

6. CARE’s policy commitments

6.1 CARE’s commitment to people living with HIV

7. CARE’s capacity and experience

8. Annexes

9. Other resources

1. Role of information management in an emergency

1.1 Overall CI roles and responsibilities for information management

1.2 Role of the Information Manager

2. Critical steps in information management

3. Emergency alerts

3.1 Writing the emergency alert

3.2 Distributing the emergency alert

4. Situation reports (sitreps)

4.1 Frequency of sitreps

4.2 Writing the sitrep

4.3 Attachments to the sitrep

4.4 Translation capacity

4.5 Distributing the sitrep

5. Internal information management at the Country Office level

5.1 Internal information management needs

5.2 Establish internal information flows and communications tools

5.3 Data and information collection and reporting

5.4 Information sources

6. Information management at CARE International level

6.1 Key CARE international stakeholders and email lists

6.2 CARE International information needs

6.3 Information the Country Office should request from CI Members

7. Handling enquiries

8. Information support for media and fundraising work

9. Meeting management

10. External information sharing

10.1 Sharing information with the host government

10.2 Peer agencies and Humanitarian Information Centres (HICs)

10.3 Sharing information with donors and reporting

10.4 Sharing information with communities and other local stakeholders

11. Documentation and archival

12. Remote support for information management

13. Infrastructure requirements

14. Operations rooms

15. Additional guidelines for non-presence operations

16. Annexes

17. Other resources